6. Joseph and Mary Gould

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On the east wall, there are two portraits. The first is of Joseph Gould. Joseph Gould was the second child born in Uxbridge and is considered to be one of the town fathers. Joseph E. Gold was born on December 29th, 1808. While at grammar school, Joseph learned that Gold was a metal and Gould was a man's name and he eventually changed his name to Gould. In 1832, Joseph Gould built a sawmill, which became the centre of town activity. People started calling the town "Gouldville". Gould was the rebellion leader of Uxbridge, and a strong supporter of William Lyon Mackenzie. He was jailed for his part in the 1837 rebellion for an undetermined period of time. In 1844, Mr. Gould built another sawmill and purchased 300 acres of land that included most of the plots in town. In 1845, he built a large flourmill and woolen mill, plus houses for all the employees. Through the construction of these various mills, Joseph Gould made employment of many men possible and largely contributed to the town's growth. Joseph Gould was also the first reeve of Uxbridge and an M.P.P. (Member of the Provincial Parliament) in the new riding of Ontario North. Joseph Gould organized the Mechanic's Institute in Uxbridge and was president of its first executive. Joseph Gould died on June 29th, 1886.

The second portrait is of Mary Gould. Joseph and Mary were married on New Years Day in 1839. He was 27 and she was 23. Formerly Mary James, she was born on October 14th, 1816. According to one account, Mary was the perfect model of a good Christian girl of the time, "innocently pure, unassuming and modest."

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